Whosoever is born of God doth not commit sin.

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1 John 3:9 Whosoever is born of God doth not commit sin; for his seed remaineth in him: and he cannot sin, because he is born of God. Together with 1 John 3:6, Whosoever abideth in him sinneth not: whosoever sinneth hath not seen him, neither known him, are difficult to understand.

These verses must be examined with the entirety of John’s first epistle. For example, 1 John 1:8 and 10, “If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us” and “If we say that we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his word is not in us.” John is clearly teaching that the Christian sins. Understanding that John clearly is not teaching sinlessness on the part of the Christian, then we must surmise that John’s intent is easily definable within the text.

John’s intended audience are Christians, “Whosoever is born of God”, and not to a select few “super Christians.” Therefore, his writing affects the entire body of believers in Christ. John’s point is “Whosoever is born of God doth not commit sin.” It is important to know that John is declaring the total absence of all sin, and not just the continuing, practice or keeping on of sin. Some Bible translations translate this verse as: “no one who is born of God will continue to sin,” (NIV). While others will use, “makes a practice of sinning” (ESV, NASB). However, this is not the original Greek. Since God is the source of the Christian birth and he is completely holy and perfect, he cannot “beget” a partially perfect child. “Like-begets-like.”

For the apostle John, the idea that a Christian will continually or habitually practice sin goes against everything that John intends. John clearly defines that man is sinful, and that no sin is allowed in the Christian in order to have fellowship with God.

For John, the believer is in a constant state of struggle with the old man, which is an enemy of God, and the new man which is a born-again believer. The war is between the “inner man which is a believer’s new nature, and the old man whose nature is a sinful nature of Adam. The “inward man” tries to serve the law of God, but the outward man serves his flesh.

We can never be free of this nature, however, the inner man, being the image of a perfect God, is regenerated and does not commit sin. (Romans 7:20-25; Galatians 2:20). The “old man” sins, however the “new man” does not and cannot sin, according to John.

Caution; John does not intend to present the Christian as being able to become sinless perfection in the outward man. Sin does exist in the believer’s life, but it is foreign and extraneous to the inward regenerated man where Christ dwells in perfect holiness.  

“…even now there are many antichrists”

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Continuing my studies in 1st John 2:18,

Little children, it is the last time: and as ye have heard that antichrist shall come, even now are there many antichrists; whereby we know that it is the last time.

antichrist” is the Greek word “antichristoswhich means “against the Messiah.”

John’s reference to “antichrists”, meant that they were evident in the church in his lifetime. It is not a 20th or 21st century arrival.

John further defines antichrists as anyone who denies that 1) Jesus is the Christ, the Messiah of the Old Testament, and 2) deny that Jesus is the only means of salvation.

Look at this following list:

  • During the time of Jesus, he preached that there were “tares among the wheat.”
  • In the churches in Galatia, there were false teachers.
  • In the church at Philippi, there were enemies of God
  • In the church at Colossi, there were teachers of heresies.

No antichrists are nothing new, but they are very active today. We should all be on our guard. Study your Bible folks. It will keep you out of heresies and false teaching.

A “Christ Like” Walk

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In light of I John 2.6, the Apostle John is describing what a “Christ Like Walk” would resemble.

1 John 2:3 And hereby we do know that we know him, if we keep his commandments. 4 He that saith, I know him, and keepeth not his commandments, is a liar, and the truth is not in him.
5 But whoso keepeth his word, in him verily is the love of God perfected: hereby know we that we are in him.
6 He that saith he abideth in him ought himself also so to walk, even as he walked.

In this passage,John also includes why a new Christian cannot attain a “Christ like” walk.
A Christ like walk is attained, based on the maturity level of the believer. Therefore, it cannot be achieved the moment one is born again, as a babe in Christ. Until the heart is fully prepared to act on and follow the commandments of God, through instruction in the Bible, led by the Holy Spirit, it is impossible to be “Christ Like.” Knowing God can only come by an intimate communion with Him, marked by obedience to the Lord’s commands. The disciple abides in Him when he fully experiences a knowledge of His love and grace. And that takes time to learn to keep His commandments, abiding in the Lord and fully resting or trust in Jesus Christ.

Walking in the Light

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1 John 1:5 This then is the message which we have heard of him, and declare unto you, that God is light, and in him is no darkness at all. 6 If we say that we have fellowship with him, and walk in darkness, we lie, and do not the truth: 7 But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin.

These 3 verses from the first Epistle of John, follow the preamble of verses 1 through 4. They set forth the importance of having a proper relationship with God that leads to fellowship with the Father and with his Son.

Starting in verse 5, John introduces God as “light” and that there is no darkness in Him at all. John is setting the table so to speak; in order to have fellowship with God, there are prerequisites.

In verses 6-7, we are introduced to “if, then” statements that John uses to demonstrate how the believer is to have fellowship with God or conversely, how to walk in darkness without fellowship with Him. John places the believers fellowship with God, Jesus Christ his own son, and fellow Christians as making his own decision to walk in darkness or walk in the light.

Verse number 6 concerns the Christian who says he has fellowship with God and yet he does not obey the commandments or following the truth of his teachings. John says, “If we say that we have fellowship with him, and walk in darkness, we lie and do not the truth.” In other words, a person who declares that they have fellowship with God and yet denies His teachings is a liar! The “if, then” statement of this verse is simply: IF we say we have fellowship with God and yet walk in darkness, THEN we lie.

The antithesis of verse 6 is found in the following verse. “But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of Jesus Christ his son cleanseth us from all sin.” John boldly announced to his readers that IF one is walking in the light THEN he is having fellowship with God and THEN he is being cleansed from all sin. As we have seen, “if, then” statements are conditional. In this case the condition is that the “cleansing from all sin” is conditional upon “walking in the light.”

Man, is not perfect, nor will he be perfect on this earth. There is nothing that man can do that will make him good enough to walk in the light. However, John makes it very clear that Christians are “walking in the light”, not due to anything they have accomplished, rather, it is what Jesus accomplished on the cross. The Christian does walk in the light and his sins are being cleansed not by any works that he could accomplish but rather by the work that Jesus did for mankind as he shed his blood on the cross. The continual process of a Christian’s “cleansing of sin”, is part of Sanctification and Justification.

In this discussion, and throughout the context of 1st John, the writer makes it very clear that he is not speaking about “positional sanctification”, which takes place at the moment of salvation. Rather, he is speaking about “progressive sanctification” which is a lifelong, continual process. Taking this one step further, John is not talking about cleansing from sin as it deals with salvation, instead, he is speaking about cleansing of sin for the purpose of having fellowship with God and with the brethren. For a Christian to have fellowship with God and other Christians, he must repent and confess his sins (progressive sanctification). The Christian must be willing to abide in communion with God by following all His commandments.

The significance of this teaching, is that God will not force his fellowship upon man just as he will not force salvation upon man. Man, is a free will agent and is responsible for all his own decisions. Man must choose salvation, he must choose to believe in God and the sacrifice of Jesus Christ. Consequently, in order for man to have fellowship with God and his son Jesus Christ, he must choose obedience.

Does God Have Authority in the Life of the Believer?

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Using Galatians 1:1-5 as reference, the Apostle Paul gives an example of how the authority of God’s calling on our life should be protected and expressed.

 Paul, an apostle—not from men nor through man, but through Jesus Christ and God the Father, who raised him from the dead—and all the brothers who are with me,

To the churches of Galatia:

Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ, who gave himself for our sins to deliver us from the present evil age, according to the will of our God and Father, to whom be the glory forever and ever. Amen.  (Galatians 1:1-5 ESV)

From a position of defending his call, the Apostle Paul gets right down to business and begins defending himself in the epistles salutation. He had a lot of ground to cover, and truth be known, so do men that are called of God into the ministry. A person that does not have the call of God to minster the Gospel, would never understand.

Paul declared to those looking to destroy his witness, that his calling and commission as an Apostle came from God and God alone; “Paul, an apostle, (not of men, neither by man, but by Jesus Christ, and God the Father, who raised him from the dead;) (Galatians 1:1). His apostleship was not voted on by other apostles as was the case with Matthias, but his came from his Damascus Road experience, where Jesus personally called Paul, just as he had called Peter, Andrew, James, John and the others. The only difference was Paul’s calling came from the resurrected Christ.

My personal calling into the ministry, was established and commissioned by God and Him alone. It was His prompting that I heard, not the voice of man. He hand was moving on my life and I made the decision to follow Jesus as a minister. My calling was just as true and sure as the Apostle Paul’s.

Just being around the Apostle Paul convinced believers, that the he was God’s man. The change in Paul was the greatest argument for his calling. Everywhere Paul went, there was no question that the man, who previously was charged by the Jewish leaders to bring Jewish converts of Christ to the Temple for trial, was now in the enemies camp, a committed follower of Jesus Christ.

For me, this is a daily focus of my life; that others would see Jesus in me by the works that Jesus does through me. I should show fruit for people to see and by doing so, they will know that I am a man of God.

Even though Paul was slandered, ridiculed and not trusted, he wept, prayed and cared for them as a true shepherd. God gave him the fertile ground of Galatia in which to work, and Paul pastored his flock. All his flock, the good, the bad and the worst, did not keep him from completing the task that God set before him.

As a pastor, it is heartwarming to see through the eyes of Paul, as he shepherds his flock. His example is a tribute to God’s grace. That is my goal as well; to love the hard to love and those that would persecute, say evil things against me or to falsely accuse me. I want to show the same love that Christ did on the cross as He said, “Father forgive them, for they know not what they do.” That is the heart of Christ, and Paul “got it” from the beginning of his ministry. That is a great comfort to me and great examples of shepherding a flock.

Paul never backed away from giving the Gospel of Christ. The cost of his ministry was summed up in his epistle to the church at Corinth:
But whatever anyone else dares to boast of—I am speaking as a fool—I also dare to boast of that. Are they Hebrews? So am I. Are they Israelites? So am I. Are they offspring of Abraham? So am I. Are they servants of Christ? I am a better one—I am talking like a madman—with far greater labors, far more imprisonments, with countless beatings, and often near death. Five times I received at the hands of the Jews the forty lashes less one. Three times I was beaten with rods. Once I was stoned. Three times I was shipwrecked; a night and a day I was adrift at sea; on frequent journeys, in danger from rivers, danger from robbers, danger from my own people, danger from Gentiles, danger in the city, danger in the wilderness, danger at sea, danger from false brothers; in toil and hardship, through many a sleepless night, in hunger and thirst, often without food, in cold and exposure. And, apart from other things, there is the daily pressure on me of my anxiety for all the churches. (2 Corinthians 11:21-28 ESV).

Paul’s example of continuing the course that God had placed before him, no matter what the circumstances, is a great example to me as well. While I have not been imprisoned, shipwrecked, stoned, cold, hungry or destitute, it is my desire to proclaim to the world the mighty salvation and work of Christ. To this end, Jesus has called me and to this end I will go.

While this blog has concerned the walk of the Apostle and the Pastor, it is also a great comfort to every believer. God has called us to become a “new man” in Christ. No one can take that away. The creator of the universe, cares so much for you that Yahweh sent His Son to die in your place. For the believer, our task is sure:

And Jesus came and spake unto them, saying, All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth. Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world. Amen. (Matthew 28:18-20)

Does God have authority over your life today?

What did the Apostle Paul believe concerning the Gospel of Grace as the only means of Salvation?

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It is very important to understand the history of Paul. In his own words, he describes himself as: “I am verily a man which am a Jew, born in Tarsus, a city in Cilicia, yet brought up in this city at the feet of Gamaliel, and taught according to the perfect manner of the law of the fathers, and was zealous toward God, as ye all are this day. And I persecuted this way unto the death, binding and delivering into prisons both men and women. As also the high priest doth bear me witness, and all the estate of the elders: from whom also I received letters unto the brethren, and went to Damascus, to bring them which were there bound unto Jerusalem, for to be punished.” (Acts 22:3-4).

Paul was not just a follower of Judaism; he was trained as a Pharisee and persecuted anyone that was not a devout adherent. This gives Paul great insight into the religion as well as describing his education. He was an enforcer of the Law. And yet now, he fully embraces salvation by grace as the only means of salvation.

Paul was God’s chosen vessel to proclaim grace to humanity and especially to the Gentiles. By his own words, it was by God’s grace that he was chosen for salvation and to be God’s messenger (Galatians 2:9).

Paul’s salvation (Acts 9) is well established by his first missionary journey in which he proclaimed the Gospel and started churches. His message of salvation is only by faith, by the Grace of God becomes the main point in all his writings.

The Apostle Paul, from the outset of the epistle to Galatia, is dealing with the heresy of adding requirements to the Gospel of Grace by faith. There is a great difference in believing that the grace of God is all that is required for salvation and those that would add works to salvation (circumcision in this case).

The Greek word for grace is charis. It is only found 13 times in the Gospels, but over 144 times in Paul’s writing. Paul’s epistles always use grace doctrinally, in connection with the dispensation of Grace.

The Apostle Paul goes so far as to proclaim; “Christ is become of no effect unto you, whosoever of you are justified by the law; ye are fallen from grace.” (Galatians 5:4)

Paul never said it was wrong for Jews to be circumcised. He never said that it was wrong to keep the Law or to observe the Jewish festivals. He said that these have nothing to do with salvation. While customs and practices may differ, salvation never differs. There is only one way to be saved and that is by the Grace of God through faith in Jesus Christ.

What is the Major Purpose for the Book of Galatians?

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The Apostle Paul wrote at least 13 books of the New Testament (many theologians believe he also wrote the book of Hebrews). Some of his epistles (letters) were written to individuals (Timothy and Titus), and the rest to churches.

The epistle of Galatians was written to the churches scattered throughout Galatia (a portion of modern Turkey). It is one of the most important writings of Paul in establishing the importance of Grace compared to the Law.

The main purpose of the Book of Galatians is to vindicate Paul’s call by God and the Gospel of Grace. “I marvel that ye are so soon removed from him that called you into the grace of Christ unto another gospel: Which is not another; but there be some that trouble you, and would pervert the gospel of Christ.” (Galatians 1:6-7)

Paul and salvation by grace alone were under attack by those in the churches of Galatia. Galatian churches were a mix of Jews and Gentiles. Some of the Jewish believers still held to the Jewish Law and traditions, called Judaizers. The term Judaizer, comes from the Greek word meaning “to live according to Jewish customs.” Their teaching states that God’s grace and human effort were required for salvation. Paul considered this theology heresy and those that teach it as false teachers, even though they professed to be followers of Christ. The problem hinged on two points: 1) If they were going to continue to keep the Law as part of their salvation, then they adhered to a belief that a person was partly saved by faith and partly by works. 2) To continue following the traditions and practices of Jewish custom, they taught that the spiritual growth of the person was partly by faith and partly by their own effort. For the Judaizers, a belief in Christ also meant following the main ritual of religion, specifically around circumcision, while adding works, such as, observing all the ceremonies, traditions and rituals of Judaism. This was a heavy burden for the Gentile converts.

Their teaching was in contradiction to the Apostle Paul’s teaching. Paul writes that salvation is by Christ and Christ alone. Paul taught that the message of God’s grace, of pure grace is salvation by Christ alone. A person cannot win, earn or deserve salvation, it is a gift of God and not of works. (Ephesians 2:8-9).

Therefore, the Judaizers charged that the Gospel that Paul was teaching was deceitful and that his apostleship was a false claim of his own making. They reasoned that he could not be a true minister or Apostle of the Lord as he claimed, by his own statement of his beliefs. They reasoned that by cutting out or minimizing the Law that he could not be a true, God called, minister of the Law.

Paul’s defense of the Gospel and his calling is the main focus of the epistle to the churches in Galatia.

 

The Fruit of the Spirit

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The Apostle Paul, in writing the epistle to the churches in Galatia, was doing so to correct several areas, one of which was the false teaching that the Law of Moses was still to be followed (particularly circumcision) in the life of the Gentile believers. In the 5th chapter, Paul focuses in on what it means to have a life dedicated to the Lord, by the work of Jesus on the cross and the Holy Spirit dwelling within the believer

In chapter 5:19-21, Paul compares the lust of the flesh, as “works”, (ἐργα [erga]). In Galatians 5:22-23, he parallels the result of the work Holy Spirit in the believer’s life and “fruit.”  “But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, Meekness, temperance: against such there is no law.” (Galatians 5:22-23)

Fruit is often used as a metaphor for a “good.” In the New Testament, and specifically in this passage, fruit is associated with a good outcome (Matt. 3:8; 7:16; John 4:36; 15:8; Rom. 1:13; 6:21). Paul’s writing conveys several uses for fruit: Fruit of light (Ephesians 5:9), fruit of righteousness (Philippians 1:11), fruit of labour (Philippians 1:22), fruit of the lips (Hebrews 13:15). According to Paul, fruit is normally result of the Holy Spirit within the heart of the believer. Paul looks at the believer as a beautiful, fruit producing tree, with gorgeous, beautiful and satisfying fruit upon it.

It is important to note that Paul refers to the work of the Holy Spirit in the believer as “fruit” and not “fruits.” Therefore, when the believer dies to himself (Galatians 2:20), the Holy Spirit exhibits all nine of these traits. It is not a best of 9 traits, but a culmination of each of these.

Paul declares that the result of the work of the Spirit in the heart of a Christian is: love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, temperance” (Galatians 5:22-23)

Therefore, if the Christian would exhibit these fruit, he would be imitating the Holy Spirit, the very nature of God.
 God is love – Romans 5:8; 1 Corinthians 13:13
 God is joy – 1 Timothy 1:6; Nehemiah 8:10; Matthew 25:21
 God is peace – Isaiah 9:6; John 16:33
 God is longsuffering – Exodus 34:6; Psalm 86:15; Romans 2:4; 1 Timothy 1:16
 God is gentle – Luke 6:35; 2 Timothy 2:24
 God is goodness – Psalm 25:8; 33:5
 God is faith – Psalm 89:1; 1 Corinthians 1:9; Ephesians 6:23
 God is meekness – Psalm 18:35; Matthew 11:29; 2 Corinthians 10:1
 God is Temperance – Galatians 5:23

Therefore, the believer is to walk in the Spirit, in the very nature of God. There is a battle within, between the lust of the flesh and the work of the Holy Spirit in our life. We are to be clean before the Lord, not falling for the desires of the wicked heart. The work of the Holy Spirit in the life of the believer will keep them clean and acceptable unto the LORD.

Let us live our live that it will be pleasing unto Him!

If you have some verses to add to the attributes of God as used in the listing of the Fruit of the Spirit, let me know what verses or passages you have found as showing the nature of God.

Book Review: The Teen Study Bible NKJV

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The Teen Study Bible NKJV, Hardback edition, Zondervan. 2015, (1626 pages).
Book Review
I do not own a single Teen Study Bible. Usually I find them simplistic and the market is filled with NIV translations. This one caught my eye as it is a New King James Version of the bestselling teen study Bible published by Zondervan. The NKJV is a trusted, word-for-word translation and as a parent, I would willingly give one to my teenagers.
The one I am reviewing is a hard cover edition printed in color. It is a very handy size of 5.5”x8.5” x 1.75” to fit most teens hands. The cover is “splashy” in design and the back of the Bible says; “This Bible keeps up with you, to help you keep up with God.”
As the title says, this is a study Bible dedicated to teenagers, incorporating helps that speak their language and age group. It is packed with many great features as outlined on the back:
Features Include:
• We Believe—Unpacks the Apostles’ Creed to reveal the biblical foundation of faith
• Panorama—Keeps the big picture of each book of the Bible in view
• 4 full-color pages—Presentation page and information about the Apostles’ Creed
• Key indexes—Helps with in-depth Bible Study
• To the Point—Reveals what the Bible says about pressing issues
• Dear Jordan—Offers biblical advice for teens
• Instant Access—Tells what God says to you personally
• Q&A—Tests your knowledge of Bible trivia
• Bible Promises—Highlights Bible verses worth remembering
• Book Introductions—Provides and overview for each book of the Bible
• 8 page, full-color map section
• Complete text of the New King James Version (NKJV) of the Bible
In my opinion, there is a heavy dose of the Apostles Creed. The opening pages lists the Apostles Creed and its history. Throughout the Bible there are references to the Apostles Creed titled “We Believe.” There is a very good explanation of how to use the Bible that any teen could comprehend. These are found throughout the Bible, using a “blue” print to identify the reader of the help.
My biggest surprise of this Bible was the inclusion of the “Preface to the NKJV.” For those teens wanting to know how this version came into being, this is a gold mine. It is written with great detail but is very easy to read and understand. Well done!
In my opinion, the “Teen Study Bible, NKJV”, is a very valuable resource for the teens of today to help keep them in the Word of God. I believe the editors and publisher are successful in their design.
The format of the Bible is “paragraph” style as many of the newer Bibles today are going. It keeps the flow of the verses in a readable format. The type is small, but readable.
This study Bible will answer many of the questions concerning, backgrounds, personal biographies, comparisons and references.
My further review:
First of all, the translation used is the New King James Version which is a trusted, word-for-word translation. It has the beauty of the KJV without the “thee’s” and “thou’s” that are antiquated from the 1600’s. Of course that is an over simplification of the differences, but you get the idea.
There are very simple, yet well written introductions to each book of the Bible. It is the 30,000 foot view of the book, which is perfect for the “get it, got it, good” crowd.
The Bible has 8 pages of full color maps.
My overall opinion is that I would gladly endorse the “Teen Study Bible, NKJV” by zondervan to any teen. I would also recommend this Bible to new believers of any age without hesitation, if they are looking for a NKJV.
On a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being highly recommended, I would give this Bible a rating: of 4+
BoLin949
Disclosure. I am a blogger for BookLook Bloggers and received this Book free from Zondervan and BookLook Bloggers Review Program. My receipt of this book was in order to review the product. I am not required to give a positive review, only my personal opinion. All opinions are mine.

Questions from Youth Camp

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Falls Creek Youth Camp, 2016

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Another Youth Camp is in the rear view mirror. Every camp takes on a different feel and this year’s camp was no different. We had many first time campers, some previous campers were now counselors and we had several new counselors to our group.

For the past four years, our church, Keys Valley Baptist Church in Belton, Texas, has joined with Grace Baptist Church in Arlington, Texas. We go to Falls Creek Youth Camp, located in the Arbuckle mountains. The responsibilities are somewhat shared and we have it down to an organized chaos.

The temperature was in the mid 90’s in southern Oklahoma each day, but that doesn’t stop our 70 campers. They participate in volleyball, soft ball, skate boarding, swimming, canoeing, zip line or many other activities. Memories are made whether it be in the rain and flood of the previous year or the heat this year.

Note: If you decide to read this list of questions, I would ask you to not only look at the question, but think about the reason for the question. I believe you will see some real struggles in the lives of these teenagers (however, there is no way of know if any of the cooks or counselors also placed questions into the box). Many come from broken homes, some abusive. Many parents are not supportive of taking their kids to church. Each year my heart is broken for these teenagers that I get to teach and love for a week. 

  • What do you do to comfort somebody with Jesus?
  • If God has always been there, were the angels always there as well?
  • What do you do if you feel like God is calling you and you don’t listen and you feel like you sinned?
  • I have been having hard thought’s? What do you do if you’re in a church and you feel like God is calling you and you don’t listen?
  • How do you get baptized faster if the other church you go to gives you a 50 question test that you have to pass to get baptized? What do you do?
  • What do you do if you want to get baptized and your pastor immediately says you’re not ready to do this?
  • What do you do if you have problems getting to church?
  • If you commit suicide, can you still go to heaven?
  • What do you do if you’re having bad thoughts and are questioning if God loves you or not?
  • How do you deal with guilt from sin?
  • How did anyone know about God before Jesus came down?
  • What is Christianity? What is God doing when good people die or have bad times?
  • What if someone dies and they have never heard the Gospel?
  • How should we pray?
  • Do you HAVE to confess with your mouth to be saved or just believe in your heart?
  • What verses can you read if you’re going through a tough time?
  • Is it good to only want to read one verse in the Bible?
  • Will I still be able to get into heaven if I believe in things the Bible doesn’t support it? For example, supporting gay marriage.
  • Is it wrong to be transgender, bisexual or gay? Will God hate me if I am? If it is wrong, I’m sorry.
  • Are gay’s allowed to be in heaven?
  • Do you love God? (question for the Apologetic’s Forum panel). Why?
  • How do we help homosexual people?
  • What do you do if when you’re reading a verse in the Bible and don’t get it?
  • Am I saved if I can’t remember when I accepted Christ, but I still believe in him? I just can’t remember the actual date.
  • How do you know the Lord is with you?
  • Is it OK if you want to get closer to God and get resaved?
  • Is it true they took things out of the Bible they didn’t want us to know about?
  • What is the difference between God the Lord & the Holy Spirit? And if none, why not call all of them one name?
  • How do you talk to people that think God is fake?
  • What do you do when you encounter an atheist that argues about your faith? What are some arguments I can use?
  • How do you overcome doubt of God?
  • Why does God love me? Is it OK to have doubts?
  • If God created earth, who created God?
  • Is God going to make us live again?
  • Did the dinosaurs exist?
  • Why is theism involved in Christianity?
  • What does God’s love mean?
  • How do we begin understanding God’s love?
  • How do we know/feel when God is speaking to you?
  • Why is evolution not in harmony with creation?
  • If you aren’t saved, can you still be saved?
  • In Revelation, it says that someone who “adds to” the Bible will have their name “blotted out of the book of life”, but as Baptists we believe no one can be separated from God after they’re saved. Can a Christian lose their salvation by adding to the Bible? Or, does getting your name removed from the book of life mean losing your salvation?

We ended up the Friday evening Apologetics Forum well after midnight. I am sure that there were many questions that were never put on paper.

Our greatest resource in America are our youth. Would you agree to pray with me for this next generation as they search for answers? Thank You.